Perilous Times

In LA’s homelessness crisis, the Skid Row is everywhere. LA spent nearly $600 (6)million in tax dollars last year to address the issue, and yet the number of homeless people increased by over 15% (5), reaching nearly 60,000 (6)people.

Perilous, Dangerous Times: Great upheaval of humans. Mass migrations, refugees, homelessness due to war, famine, pestilence, natural disasters, political persecution, ethnic persecution, religious persecution, economic conflict. The time will be exceedingly ‘dangerous’ for migrant/refugee women baring young children, who have little to no access to food, shelter, medicine, water or protection. It will be so perilous that those women who don’t have babies or young children will be considered ‘lucky.’

2 Timothy 3:1 This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come.

Matthew 24:19 And woe unto them that are with child, and to them that give suck in those days!

Mark 13:17 But woe to them that are with child, and to them that give suck in those days!

Luke 21:23But woe unto them that are with child, and to them that give suck, in those days! for there shall be great distress in the land, and wrath upon this people.

Luke 23:29 For, behold, the days are coming, in the which they shall say, Blessed are the barren, and the wombs that never bare, and the paps which never gave suck.

Matthew 24:21. For then shall be great tribulation, such as was not since the beginning of the world to this time, no, nor ever shall be.

In LA’s homelessness crisis, the Skid Row is everywhere. LA spent nearly $600 (6)million in tax dollars last year to address the issue, and yet the number of homeless people increased by over 15% (5), reaching nearly 60,000 (6)people.

By LZ Granderson Updated 6:26 PM ET, 2019 CNN

(CNN) Many are angry and wondering why government officials have been unable to solve the homelessness crisis in Los Angeles.

LA spent nearly $600 (6)million in tax dollars last year to address the issue, and yet the number of homeless people increased by over 15% (5), reaching nearly 60,000 (6)people.

As a Los Angeles resident, I am among those who wonder what the mayor’s office is doing. When I lived downtown it was virtually impossible to walk a full block in any direction without seeing a homeless person. In Silver Lake where I live now, there are tent cities. On my drive to work I see people living underneath the highway overpasses. It’s no longer Skid Row here. The skid is everywhere.

There’s not a city I’ve lived in that didn’t have people you learn to unsee. Sometimes I give directly to someone who asks. Sometimes I buy a meal. But most times I force myself not to care enough to stop because to stop is to admit there’s something I can do.

Instead, I ask myself, “where are my tax dollars going and what are our politicians doing with it?” I pay taxes so that the people I voted for can handle it. Then I’m reminded that homelessness, like most socioeconomic issues, is complicated. There isn’t a single answer because there isn’t a single reason why someone is living on the streets.

They’re not all drug addicts. They’re not all lazy. They all didn’t choose to be without a home. Brokenness comes in many forms — like mental illness, a disenfranchised veteran, a transgender woman fleeing a violent environment.

These are not random hypotheses, these are the stories I have been told when I do stop and ask them about themselves in an effort to try to help. For example, in Chicago, there was a homeless man I would occasionally buy food for because medical bills forced him out of his home. And yeah, some are drug addicts… but that doesn’t mean they are not worthy of compassion. Worthy of being treated like a human being.

All of which brings me back to the decline of religious identity. While it is fair to wonder what our elected officials are doing with our tax dollars to solve the issue, I do wonder what our religious figures are doing with their tax-exempt status regarding the issue. There are several mega churches within Los Angeles County alone with weekly attendance well over 5,000 (5), which begs the question: How is it possible that 60,000 are living in the streets, while so many self-identified Christian Evangelicals are worshipping in buildings large enough to house that many parishioners?

When you watch the video of a man like Kenneth Copeland justifying his lavish lifestyle juxtaposed against the story of rampant homelessness, it becomes a bit easier to understand why so many Americans have decided not to be a part of organized religion. (Night Watchman Note: K.C. is a false teacher, false prophet, deceiver, this article is a classic case of what appears to many people to be true Christianity in America, but is not. False teachers and false prophets (doctrines of devils) turn people off to the true gospel and point their spiritual heart elsewhere. Usually towards the false teacher, when a lot of money is involved).

Perhaps instead of looking outward for reasons why people’s hearts have moved away from the church, maybe the church should spend time looking inward. This week, the issue of homelessness is about what’s going on in Los Angeles, but isn’t it a problem all around the country?

There also isn’t a major urban hub without a church resting on prime real estate, collecting thousands in non-taxed donations and tithes each week. The government needs to be a better steward of our taxes. I can stop to help more as well. But I would argue that the self-proclaimed body of Christ (Note: Kenneth Copeland is not) has leaders who could use a serious tune-up as well.

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