Spiritual Apostasy or The Great Falling Away

Millennials and moral relativism. Spiritual Apostasy. Seeking ‘good’ and ‘morality’ without God or Christ. No need to identify with Christ, the Forgiveness of Sins or Salvation, or the Resurrection. Good and Morality is whatever you think it is… or what you make it to be. The Great Satanic Lie.

Millennials and moral relativism. Spiritual Apostasy. Seeking ‘good’ and ‘morality’ without God or Christ. No need to identify with Christ, the Forgiveness of Sins or Salvation, or the Resurrection. Good and Morality is whatever you think it is… or what you make it to be. The Great Satanic Lie.

July 19, 2019. RNS. tara-isabella-burton

(article excerpts).

Murdoch explored the potential of seeking the Good without a personal God. At once intensely, even obsessively, concerned with the pursuit of the morally good life and suspicious of what she saw as the illusory nature of organized religion, Murdoch demanded that her readers contend with a world that was at once secular and meaningful: one in which there was no certainty about the divine but in which there was a metaphysically real sense of right and wrong.

Meanwhile, she regarded the fiction of the 20th century, written in the wake of the so-called death of God, as either “existentialist” or “mystic,” recognizing nothing outside of the self and the self’s will. As far as religious truth goes, there was at best some world beyond the self that we do not yet understand. For Murdoch, a sense of The Good — a moral perception of goodness beyond theology — had the potential to serve as our way forward.

Millennials are far more likely than their elders to identify with moral relativism. About three-fourths of millennials say they agree with the statement that “Whatever is right for your life or works best for you is the only truth you can know.” Yet current television shows that depict and draw the millennial crowd such as “The Good Place” and “Fleabag” increasingly reveal our generation’s ambiguity about relativism, by exploring in its place the problem of goodness without God. “Follow your truth” relativism and moral freewheeling of millennial culture and ask aloud: “Is that all there is?”

For all our cultural handwriting about millennial selfishness, more and more millennials are actively seeking modes of contemporary “unselfing.”

It’s possible, in fact, to see the rise of one of the most ubiquitous of millennial “civil religions” — social justice culture — as an attempt to transcend pure moral relativism.

Millennial social justice is thoroughly secular but is at the same time deeply concerned with universal moral truths and obligations. Millennials aim for the wholesale dismantling of social structures that they see as not merely relatively, but ontologically, evil.

Social justice culture pursues what it sees as a universal Good, even as it refuses to collapse that Goodness into a tradition that says good is determined by a deity. Certainly, social justice’s call to solidarity — and, in particular, to a self’s membership in marginalized identity categories — can be read as a new form of “unselfing”: countering secular notions of fully autonomous selves with a vision of the self-in-community.

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