Fearful Sights

Hurricane season is approaching. This is the first forecast for 2019

Blog note. Jesus indicated that ‘fearful sights’ (various natural disasters) would occur leading up to the time known as the Tribulation and Great Tribulation (a combined seven year period of great destruction on earth). Although these types of things have occurred in the past for centuries and thousands of years, they could be identified as the ‘season of the times’ due to the ferociousness of these events. They would be occurring in greater intensity, severity, frequency, size, duration, scope … just like the pains that a woman experiences in labor the farther along she is in the labor process. We are in the ‘season of the times’ that comes just before the seven (7) year Tribulation/Great Tribulation period
… And great earthquakes shall be in diverse places, and famines, and pestilences; and fearful sights and great signs shall there be from heaven. (Luke 21:11).
… And there shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the stars; and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity; the sea and the waves roaring; (Luke 21:25)
… Men’s hearts failing them for fear, and for looking after those things which are coming on the earth: for the powers of heaven shall be shaken; (Luke 21:26)
… This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come. (2 Timothy 3:1)
Jesus is giving a series of prophecies about what to look for as the age of grace comes to a close. These verses are several of many such prophecies from throughout the Bible. 2017 was the worst year in recorded history for the intensity, frequency, severity, duration and occurrence of a large number of severe natural disasters worldwide. Earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes, typhoons, cyclones, torrential flooding, unprecedented wildfires in unusual places, devastating droughts, excessive/scorching heat setting records everywhere, record snowfalls in Europe and Russia. Snow in the Arabia. This list can go on. Most studied Eschatologists believe these ‘fearful sights’ and massive natural disasters are all part of the ‘CONVERGENCE’ of signs that this Biblical and prophetic age is closing. Most people who study prophecy are familiar with the routine reference(s) made that these things will be like a woman having labor.

Hurricane season is approaching. This is the first forecast for 2019

Doyle Rice USA TODAY•April 5, 2019

After yet another catastrophic hurricane season in the USA in 2018, which featured such ferocious storms as Florence and Michael, top hurricane forecasters made their first prediction for the 2019 season, which begins June 1.

Thanks to a weak El Niño, experts expect a “slightly below-average Atlantic hurricane season.” Meteorologist Phil Klotzbach and other experts from Colorado State University – among the nation’s top seasonal hurricane forecasters – predict 13 named tropical storms will form, five of which will become hurricanes.

An average season has 12 tropical storms, six of which are hurricanes.

A tropical storm becomes a hurricane when its wind speed reaches 74 mph. 

Of the five predicted hurricanes, two are expected to spin into major hurricanes – Category 3, 4 or 5 – with sustained wind speeds of 111 mph or greater. The group said there’s a near-average chance for major hurricanes to make landfall along the U.S. coastline. Klotzbach put the chance of a major hurricane strike at 39%. 

Last year, Florence and Michael combined to kill more than 100 Americans and cost nearly $50 billion in damage, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said.

The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30, though storms sometimes form outside those dates.

The team predicts that 2019 hurricane activity will be about 75% of the average season. By comparison, 2018’s hurricane activity was about 120% of the average season.

Colorado State’s prediction in 2018 was quite good. Last year, the team predicted 14 tropical storms would form, of which seven would become hurricanes. In all, 15 tropical storms developed, and eight strengthened into hurricanes.

One of the major determining factors in hurricane forecasting is whether the USA is in an El Niño or La Niña climate pattern.

“The current weak El Niño event appears likely to maintain intensity or perhaps even strengthen during the summer/fall,” according to the forecast.

El Niño is a natural warming of tropical Pacific Ocean water, which tends to suppress the development of Atlantic hurricanes. Its opposite, La Niña, marked by cooler ocean water, tends to increase hurricanes in the Atlantic.

Another limiting factor: Tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures are slightly cooler than average. Hurricanes are fueled in part by warm seawater. 

Insurance companies, emergency managers and the media use the forecasts to prepare Americans for the year’s hurricane threat. The team’s annual predictions provide the best estimate of activity during the upcoming season, not an exact measure, according to Colorado State.

“We issue these forecasts to satisfy the curiosity of the general public and to bring attention to the hurricane problem,” the university said. “There is a general interest in knowing what the odds are for an active or inactive season.”

The university, under the direction of meteorologist William Gray, was the first group to predict seasonal hurricane activity in the mid-1980s. Gray died in 2016.

This is the team’s 36th forecast. It covers the Atlantic basin, which includes the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico.

AccuWeather released its hurricane forecast for the upcoming season Wednesday, predicting that 12-14 named storms would form, of which five to seven will be hurricanes. The firm said two to four are likely to hit the USA.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will issue its forecast in late May.

The first named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season will be Arlene, followed by Barry, Chantal, Dorian, Erin, Fernand and Gabrielle.

Colorado State forecasters will update their predictions three times over the next few months, on June 4, July 2 and Aug. 6.

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