Volcanoes

High-impact eruption at Manam volcano, ash to 15.2 km (50 000 feet) a.s.l., Papua New Guinea

Blog note. Jesus indicated that ‘fearful sights’ (various natural disasters) would occur leading up to the time known as the Tribulation and Great Tribulation (a combined seven year period of great destruction on earth). Although these types of things have occurred in the past for centuries and thousands of years, they could be identified as the ‘season of the times’ due to the ferociousness of these events. They would be occurring in greater intensity, severity, frequency, size, duration, scope … just like the pains that a women experiences in labor the farther along she is in the labor process. We are in the ‘season of the times’ that comes just before the seven (7) year Tribulation/Great Tribulation period

… And great earthquakes shall be in diverse places, and famines, and pestilences; and fearful sights and great signs shall there be from heaven. (Luke 21:11).

… And there shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the stars; and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity; the sea and the waves roaring; (Luke 21:25)

… Men’s hearts failing them for fear, and for looking after those things which are coming on the earth: for the powers of heaven shall be shaken; (Luke 21:26)

… This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come. (2 Timothy 3:1)

Jesus is giving a series of prophecies about what to look for as the age of grace comes to a close. These verses are several of many such prophecies from throughout the Bible. 2017 was the worst year in recorded history for the intensity, frequency, severity, duration and occurrence of a large number of severe natural disasters worldwide. Earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes, typhoons, cyclones, torrential flooding, unprecedented wildfires in unusual places, devastating droughts, excessive/scorching heat setting records everywhere, record snowfalls in Europe and Russia. Snow in the Arabia. This list can go on. Most studied Eschatologists believe these ‘fearful sights’ and massive natural disasters are all part of the ‘CONVERGENCE’ of signs that this Biblical and prophetic age is closing. Most people who study prophecy are familiar with the routine reference(s) made that these things will be like a woman having labor pains that occur in greater severity, frequency, size and duration prior to giving birth. End of note.

High-impact eruption at Manam volcano, ash to 15.2 km (50 000 feet) a.s.l., Papua New Guinea

Posted by Teo Blašković on January 23, 2019. Watchers.news

A powerful eruption started at Papua New Guinea’s Manam volcano around 04:48 UTC on January 23, 2019. The Aviation Color Code is Red.

The Darwin VAAC first reported the eruption at 04:49 UTC with ash estimated at a height of 12.2 km (40 000 feet) a.s.l.

The eruption is clearly ongoing despite widespread meteorological cloud in the area, the center said 05:32 UTC. Plume to 13.7 km (45 000 feet) appears to be moving W, lower-level emission to 7.6 km (25 000 feet) is moving northeast.

At 07:32 UTC, height was revised to 15.2 km (50 000 feet) and 6 km (20 000 feet) based on the movement of plumes. Volcanic ash to 15.2 km moving west remains discernible, However volcanic ash to 6 km, moving north and east, is obscured by meteorological cloud.

This volcano is experiencing similar high-impact eruptions over the past couple of months. The last one took place on January 11, 2019, with ash plume rising up to 15.2 km a.s.l. An even stronger eruption took place on January 7, up to 16.7 km (55 000 feet) a.s.l. It was the highest plume produced by the volcano since 2015 when VA rose to 19.8 km (65 000 feet) a.s.l.

A sudden, high-impact eruption took place on August 24, 2018, producing lava flows that forced 2 000 villagers to flee to safety.

A major eruption of this volcano forced the evacuation of some 9 000 people in 2004. Many of them still reside at a camp on the outskirts of Madang.

Geological summary

The 10-km-wide (6.2 miles) island of Manam, lying 13 km (8 miles) off the northern coast of mainland Papua New Guinea, is one of the country’s most active volcanoes. Four large radial valleys extend from the unvegetated summit of the conical 1 807-m-high (5 928 feet) basaltic-andesitic stratovolcano to its lower flanks.

These “avalanche valleys” channel lava flows and pyroclastic avalanches that have sometimes reached the coast. Five small satellitic centers are located near the island’s shoreline on the northern, southern, and western sides.

Two summit craters are present; both are active, although most historical eruptions have originated from the southern crater, concentrating eruptive products during much of the past century into the SE valley.

Frequent historical eruptions, typically of mild-to-moderate scale, have been recorded since 1616. Occasional larger eruptions have produced pyroclastic flows and lava flows that reached flat-lying coastal areas and entered the sea, sometimes impacting populated areas. (GVP)

Featured image: Manam erupting on December 8, 2019. Credit: Brian Malone

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