Convergence of Signs

Hurricane Florence, the first major hurricane of the year, could pose a threat to the US East Coast

Bog note: And great earthquakes shall be in diverse places, and famines, and pestilences; and fearful sights and great signs shall there be from heaven. (Luke 21:11). Jesus is giving a series of prophecies about what to look for as the age of grace comes to a close. This verse from Luke is one of many such prophecies from throughout the Bible. 2017 was the worst year in recorded history for the intensity, frequency, severity, duration and occurrence of a large number of severe natural disasters worldwide. Earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes, typhoons, cyclones, torrential flooding, unprecedented wildfires in unusual places, devastating droughts, excessive/scorching heat setting records everywhere, record snowfalls in Europe and Russia. Snow in the Arabia. This list can go on. Most studied eschatologists believe these ‘fearful sights’ and massive natural disasters are all part of the ‘CONVERGENCE’ of signs that this Biblical and prophetic age is closing. Most people who study prophecy are familiar with the routine reference(s) made that these things will be like a woman having labor pains that occur in greater severity, frequency, size and duration prior to giving birth. End of note.

Hurricane Florence, the first major hurricane of the year, could pose a threat to the US East Coast

By Brandon Miller, CNN Meteorologist. Updated 5:00 PM ET, Wed September 5, 2018

Hurricane Florence is still way out in the Atlantic, but the Category 4 storm could threaten the US East Coast by late next week. The first major hurricane of the 2018 season, Florence on Wednesday afternoon had maximum sustained winds of 130 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center. It was about 2,000 miles from the US coastline, still way too far out for a confident landfall prediction.

Still, the European and American computer models showed a menacing hurricane coming dangerously close late next week to North Carolina’s Outer Banks, a significant shift westward from earlier model runs. Other predictions, though, showed Florence staying 500 miles offshore.

The storm’s track will depend on the development and movement of a number of weather systems as the storm gets steered by a large ridge of high pressure in the Eastern United States and northern Atlantic Ocean, as well as the progress of a low-pressure trough across the country. So, while it’s certainly not time to press the panic button — the models likely will change significantly over the next week to 10 days — Florence definitely bears watching closely.

Even if Florence stays out to sea, models show numerous other systems developing over the Atlantic, almost on cue as the hurricane season hits its peak on September 10. The eight weeks around that date often are prime time for the conditions that fuel powerful storms.

The focus on Florence comes less than a day after Tropical Storm Gordon made landfall on the US Gulf Coast, leaving one child dead and ushering storms through Monday across the western South and the Midwest.

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